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Mark Verheiden
Mark Verheiden
Name
Mark Verheiden
Birthplace
USA
Birth date
March 26, 1956
Gender
Male
Profession
Motion picture producer and writer, comic writer
Season
{{{Season}}}
Seasons
1, 2
Role
{{{Role}}}
Roles
  • Co-Executive Producer (Season 1)
  • Consulting Producer (Season 2)
  • Writer (Season 1 & 2)
First episode
Last episode
Credits
15 episodes (see below)
Credit
{{{Credit}}}
Mark Verheiden, born March 26, 1956, is an American motion picture producer and writer. He also works as a comic writer. He was a Co-Executive Producer and Writer for the first season of Falling Skies. He returned as a Consulting Producer and writer for the second season

BiographyEdit

Earlier careerEdit

Verheiden's introduction into writing comics came in 1986 when he wrote about Black Cross for the Dark Horse Presents anthology series. In June 1987 he penned The American, which was published by Dark Horse Comics in its second year of operation. Starting in March 1988, he wrote what was to be the first of many Verheiden/Dark Horse comics based on the 20th Century Fox film-series Aliens.

Also in 1988 he wrote his first feature, titled Terror Squad. The film was about a group of Libyan terrorists capturing an American power plant. It received mixed reviews.

In January 1989, he wrote the first of several stories featuring Superman for DC Comics' then-weekly title Action Comics, from #635. He wrote a Secret Origins Special issue for DC in 1989. A four issue comic miniseries based on the licensed film property Predator followed for Dark Horse in 1989. He also wrote the Dark Horse adaptation of the comedy film Big that year. He contributed to the lauded A1 anthology in 1989.

He wrote a thirteen issue story featuring the popular character The Phantom from 1989 to 1990. The arc took on real-world issues, such as poisoning, illegal weapon trading, racism, and toxic dumping. The stories usually took a more psychological approach than the Lee Falk written comic strips. Luke McDonnell was the regular artist.

This was followed in 1990 by Stalkers, a 12 issues series for Marvel Comics' Epic Comics imprint. He wrote a follow-up miniseries to Aliens. The four issue series Aliens: Earth War was published by Dark Horse in 1990. He also wrote a follow-up Predator four issue series entitled Predator: Concrete Jungle. Dark Horse also published a special featuring The American.

In 1991 he wrote a further Predator four issue miniseries entitled Predator: Cold War, again for Dark Horse. He also wrote a special issue of Human Target for DC comics.

In 1992 he wrote a follow-up miniseries to The American, entitled The American: Lost in America. The four issue miniseries was published by Dark Horse comics.

He co-wrote the story for the 1994 film The Mask with Michael Fallon. The film was based on a DC comics property and was a box office success. He wrote the story "Timecop" for the Dark Horse Presents anthology. The story was adapted into a feature film. Verheiden co-wrote the story for the film with DC comics founder Mike Richardson. Verheiden also wrote the screenplay for the film. The action movie starred Jean Claude Van Damme and was a box office success.

In 1995 he wrote the Batman miniseries Batman: Featuring Two-Face and The Riddler for DC comics.

In 1996 he wrote the four issue miniseries Predator: Dark River for Dark Horse comics. He also wrote the Aliens stories Aliens: Outbreak, Aliens: Nightmare Asylum, and Aliens: Female War.

In summer 1997 he made his television writing debut with an episode of the short-lived science fiction anthology Perversions of Science. The series aired for a single season on the cable Home Box Office network.

In fall 1997 he joined the crew of the Timecop television adaptation for the the American Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) network. He was credited as the creator of the series because of his work on the comic source. He also served as a supervising producer and writer for the show. He wrote the second episode "The Heist", the fifth episode "Rocket Science", and the seventh episode "Lost World". The series was canceled before completing its first season.

In the 1998 to 1999 television season he wrote an episode of new action series Marshal Law. He wrote the twentieth first season episode "Red Storm".

In the 1999 to 2000 season he was a consulting producer and writer for the UPN series The Strip. He scripted the episodes "Murder by Numbers" and "Even Better Than the Real Thing".

In the 2000 to 2001 season he wrote for the Fox network's new science fiction comedy drama Freakylinks. He scripted the episodes "Subject: Me and My Shadow" and "Subject: The Final Word".

In the 2001 to 2002 season he was hired as a supervising producer and writer for new Superman origin series Smallville on the Warner Brothers network. He wrote the first season episodes "X-Ray" and "Vogue". He also co-wrote the episodes "Shimmer" and "Obscura" with Michael Green. He remained a supervising producer and writer for the second season, which began fall 2002. He wrote the episodes "Heat", "Dichotic", and "Witness" and co-wrote the episode "Suspect" with Philip Levens. "Suspect" was directed by Greg Beeman, who would later collaborate with Verheiden on Falling Skies. He was promoted to Co-Executive Producer for the third season in fall 2003. He wrote the episode "Perry" and co-wrote the episode "Hereafter" with Drew Greenberg. "Hereafter" was again directed by Beeman. In 2004 he wrote two issues for the Smallville comic. He left the crew of Smallville at the close of the third season having written ten episodes of the show. In 2005 he wrote the Superman miniseries Superman The Journey for DC comics. He also wrote the television feature Dark Shadows.

In summer 2005 he joined the crew of the successful science fiction drama Battlestar Galactica as a Consulting Producer and writer for the second season. The show was a reboot of the 1970s series of the same name and was produced by the SyFy network. He wrote the eighth episode "Final Cut" and was hired as a Co-Executive Producer from that episode onwards. He wrote the episode "Black Market" and co-wrote the season finale "Lay Down Your Burdens: Part 2" with Anne Cofell Saunders.

In 2006 he wrote the Superman story Superman: Sacrifice. He remained a Co-Executive Producer and writer for the third season of Battlestar Galactica in fall 2006. He wrote the episodes "Collaborators", "The Eye of Jupiter", "A Day in the Life" and the season finale "Crossroads: Part 2".

In 2007 he wrote the crossover Superman/Batman: The Enemies Among Us and the miniseries Supergirl: Candor for DC comics. He wrote the film My Name is Bruce, which starred Bruce Campbell. He was a Co-Executive Producer for the feature length special Battlestar Galactica: Razor and the associated web series Battlestar Galactica: Razor Flashbacks, both of which premiered in fall 2007.

Also in 2007, Verheiden worked on an unproduced live-action screenplay for a Teen Titans film for Warner Bros. He also wrote an unproduced adaptation of his own Ark comic (written for Dark Horse Presents in the mid-1990s) for Sony Pictures.

He returned as a Co-Executive Producer and writer for the fourth and final season of 'Battlestar Galactica in 2008. He wrote the episodes "The Road Less Traveled" and "The Oath". He wrote for nine episodes over the series run. In 2008 he also wrote the four issue comic adaptation of the horror film Evil Dead. Verheiden was no stranger to the Evil Dead team, having previously worked with the director Sam Raimi on Timecop, written a pilot for the producer Rob Tapert and produced the screenplay for the star Bruce Campbell's film My Name is Bruce.

In summer 2008 he joined the crew of Heroes as a consulting producer and writer for the third season. The superhero drama was preparing its story arc "Volume Four: Fugitives" and he wrote the episode "Chapter Two 'Trust and Blood'" and co-wrote the episode "Chapter Nine 'Turn and Face the Strange'" with Rob Fresco. The episodes aired in early 2009.

In 2009, DreamWorks announced that Verheiden was writing Quatermain, a live action feature project. His screenplay remains unfilmed.

He wrote the second episode of the Battlestar Galactica prequel Caprica for the SyFy network in 2009. The episode, "Rebirth", aired in early 2010. The show was canceled while airing its first season.

He rejoined Heroes as a consulting producer and writer for the fourth season in fall 2009. He returned to the crew for the episode "Chapter Six 'Strange Attractors'" in the "Volume Five: Redemption" arc. He co-wrote the episode "Chapter Nine 'Brother's Keeper'" with Fresco and co-wrote the episode "Chapter Sixteen 'The Art of Deception'" with Misha Green. The show was canceled at the close of its fourth season.

During Falling SkiesEdit

In 2011 he joined the crew of Falling Skies as a Co-Executive Producer and writer for the first season. He was joined as a Co-Executive Producer by Greg Beeman, with whom he had collaborated on Smallville. He wrote the episode "What Hides Beneath" and the season finale "Eight Hours". "Eight Hours" was directed by Beeman.

In 2011, Verheiden was named executive producer and writer for The Dark Tower mini-series.

In 2012, Verheiden was named executive producer and writer for Hemlock Grove, a television series produced by Gaumont International Television for Netflix.

Verheiden is also an executive producer of The Family, a project in development on the SyFy Network.

He returned as a Consulting Producer and writer for the second season in 2012. His Battlestar Galactica colleagues Bradley Thompson and David Weddle took over the Co-Executive Producer and writer position. Verheiden scripted the season premiere "Worlds Apart" and the episode "The Price of Greatness". "Worlds Apart" was directed by Beeman.

CreditsEdit

WriterEdit

Co-Executive ProducerEdit

Consulting ProducerEdit

External LinksEdit

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